#FBRape – a Clarification of the Campaign to Change Facebook’s Policy on Hate Speech Removal

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May 27, 2013 by gabnormal

In the past week there has been a lot of buzz surrounding what is known as the #FBRape campaign.

It took me a bit to figure out exactly what this was, and after combing through many tweets and articles, I was able to clarify what #FBRape is referring to.

Here is a crash course on the campaign, what it’s doing, who the key players are and why it’s the greatest thing since microwave waffles.

Essentially what has been happening for many years is that Facebook is allwing pages which depict racism, homophobia and a large amount of extreme violence against women to stay on the site, claiming that these pages fall under the humor category, while they remove content depicting women who have survived breast cancer, or who are breast feeding their children, citing it as offensive due to nudity.

First, let’s start with the legal definition of hate speech, and what it entails.

uslegal hate speech

This is how Facebook defines hate speech:

facebook hate speech

Next, let’s take a quick look at how Facebook identifies abusive behavior:

facebook types of behavior id as abusive

These are Facebook’s policies about what isn’t allowed on their site:

facebook our policies

Here are their community standards as relevant to this post:

facebook community standards violence and threats

facebook community standards

For good measure, here are Facebook’s terms and conditions:

facebook safety

Facebook even tells its users how to report inappropriate content:

facebook report abuse

But, that’s not always effective, because Facebook doesn’t remove everything that gets reported:

facebook remove everything that is reported

Now, here are some examples of what Facebook is allowing to remain, and therefore promoting, on their site (warning: graphic content).

Women, Action & The Media along with these lovely ladies and Make Me a Sammich are doing a fantastic job at raising awareness through the #FBRape Campaign, which as a whole is doing everything in its power to remove such damaging content from Facebook and to get the $60 billion a year social networking company to change their policies by asking the companies who advertise with FB to pull their ads until something changes and the hate related content is removed. In the interim, Facebook has been removing ads from these pages, but not removing the pages themselves.

In case you couldn’t tell, Zuckerberg, that’s not the problem here.

Why are most of the problem pages targeted at women? And it’s not the pages that make money, it’s the ads. With 50 million pages on Facebook, why is it necessary to keep the offensive ones up?

At this point, I don’t even want an answer to any of the above questions. I just want to see a change in such damaging policies coming from a site that has 1.11 billion monthly users where 10 percent of those users are reportedly age 13-17.

Facebook, this shit has got to go.

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5 thoughts on “#FBRape – a Clarification of the Campaign to Change Facebook’s Policy on Hate Speech Removal

  1. Rosie says:

    Reblogged this on FEMBORG.

  2. […] content such as this, though in a more severe form, was just an issue on Facebook in the #FBRape campaign that was also heavily broadcasted across Twitter. There has been an upsurge in content […]

  3. […] but none of the actual act everyone is talking about. Kudos, Google, Instagram, Twitter and even Facebook (though your actions in the past have been less than pleasing), for doing your job right and removing the photos of this […]

  4. […] why does social media have such a problem with it? Facebook was under fire recently for allowing content that promoted rape and abuse towards women while they wouldn’t […]

  5. […] site to remove the photo, which isn’t surprising considering Facebook has been known to support what they consider comedy, when really it’s harassment that often encourages stereotypes and violence against […]

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